Cindy Gordon
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 774-249-4824 | [email protected]


Posted by Cindy Gordon on 4/25/2021

All house buyers have different pet peeves when it comes to evaluating homes, but there are a lot of easy fixes you can do to reduce the chances of losing a sale. Here are a few tips to keep in mind.

Squeaky doors: Lubricating squeaky hinges is one of the easiest things you can do to improve your chances of making a positive impression on prospective home buyers. A seemingly small thing like squeaky door hinges can make your house seem old, poorly maintained, and in disrepair. A squeaky door hinge is probably not going to make or break the sale of your house, but in combination with other little flaws that prospects might notice, it could have a major impact.

Weeds cropping up: Another clear signal to prospects that your property hasn't been properly maintained -- at least in their minds -- is the existence of weeds. Other than an overgrown lawn, nothing detracts from curb appeal more than weeds coming up everywhere, especially in driveway cracks, walkways, and front steps. If your home is on the market or you're considering selling it in the near future, getting rid of noticeable weeds will help improve your property's curb appeal and make a better impression on prospective buyers. If you hate the idea of handling or applying commercial weed killers, non-toxic household items like vinegar or salt have been known to nip the weed problem in the bud. Whether you use store-bought herbicides or natural remedies, make sure you don't damage any nearby plants that you want to protect. In some cases, manually pulling out weeds and carefully digging out the roots is the most risk-free approach, although it's also the most labor intensive!

Dust and cobwebs: No matter how thorough you think you've been in cleaning your house, you're probably going to miss a few spots that prospective buyers will notice. In small amounts, a little dust is not going to make or break your sale, but like squeaky door hinges, small problems add up! Areas that homeowners and house cleaners often overlook include baseboards, ceiling fans, and corners of ceilings.

Unpleasant odors: If your house smells like pets, mold, or mothballs, that sometimes can be a deal breaker. Bad odors are a major sensory turnoff that could easily sour people on the idea of making an offer on your house. Musty odors are often indicative of a larger problem, such as a damp basement, leaky pipes, water damage, or mold infestation. Eliminating odors prior to having your house shown can be as simple as doing a thorough cleaning, or as complex and expensive as hiring a mold remediation service.

The good news about preparing your home for sale is that a seasoned real estate agent can provide you with the advice, guidance, and help you need to maximize your chances for attracting offers and selling your property for its full market value.





Posted by Cindy Gordon on 2/28/2021

If your house is already on the market, you're probably familiar with the hectic process of getting it in presentable condition for the next showing.

Since there are so many things to remember, it can be helpful to create a "pre-showing checklist" you can refer to whenever you need it. Your reliance on the list will probably diminish over time, but it can be a good way to become more organized, focused, and efficient.

Even the simple action of writing down your priorities will make an impression on your mind and help reinforce your memory of what needs to be done prior to a showing or open house. Here are a few tips for staying on track, simplifying the process, and remembering important tasks that are all-too-easy to forget.

Stay One Step Ahead of Dust

Ideally, every room in your house should be dusted at least once a week, but that chore often tends to get postponed, overlooked, or just plain avoided! The problem with not dusting on a regular basis is that it tends to accumulate and get worse. What often occurs to home sellers is the sudden realization -- typically, just before walking out the door prior to a scheduled house showing -- that there's a thick layer of dust on your window blinds, baseboards, or book shelves.

If you're literally minutes away from a real estate agent showing up at your front door with clients, it's generally too late to do anything about the dust accumulations. However, if you've tackled those issues a day or two before they're walking up your front pathway, you can put your mind at ease that you've conquered the "grunge factor"! If you happen to have a housekeeper handling those details, it might pay to casually remind them to do an extra-thorough job on those dusty, grungy areas.

If you have kids (and even if you don't), dirt, finger prints, and hand smudges can often be found around light switches, cabinets, and door areas. While that might be the last thing you think about when preparing your home for a showing, it could be one of the first things potential buyers notice. Although perfection is an unrealistic standard to aspire to, "the devil is in the details!" In other words, it can be the small, easily overlooked details that undermine your chances for making a great impression on prospective buyers.

A Word About Mouse Traps

Whether you live in a mansion or a bungalow, nearly all homeowners occasionally have problems with mice sneaking into their basement, garage, or attic. Sometimes the little critters even find their way into your main living area (eek!). That's why it makes sense to set up a few mouse traps in areas where mice are most likely to enter. Mouse traps come in a variety of designs, some of which are better for homes with pets, children, or squeamish adults!

When it comes to preparing for a house showing, it's always a good idea to check mousetraps for "victims" that may have sprung your devices. Ideally, mousetraps shouldn't be placed in conspicuous spots, but you definitely don't want buyers to see dead mice anywhere in your house. Granted, live ones are worse, but -- in either case -- any infestation (or the perception of one) could be a deal breaker!





Posted by Cindy Gordon on 7/12/2020

Image by pascalhelmer from Pixabay

You’ve spent months scouring home listings and viewing houses. Once you found your dream home, you signed the contracts and successfully closed. Congratulations! It’s time to get started on this next exciting chapter of your life.

While you’re probably eager to move your belongings into your new home, it’s a good idea to pause for a moment and plan to give your new house a deep cleaning. Here are five areas you’ll want to focus on before you start hauling in your possessions.

1. Bathrooms

Bathrooms are a priority because you’ll want to eliminate any potential germs lurking about. Even if everything looks clean, you can’t know for sure if it’s only been surface-cleaned, so you’ll want to give it your own deep cleaning. This way you can ensure any bacteria or other icky germs aren’t lingering. Focus on the toilet, sink, and tub. Don’t forget the toilet seat—ideally, install a new one.

Tip: Change the shower curtain and liner or, if you’re keeping the existing curtain because it matches the décor, give it a good machine wash.

2. Kitchens

Kitchens are another room where germs tend to linger. To start, clean the interiors of the oven and refrigerator. Next, use disinfectant to wash down the sink, faucet, counters, cabinets and all appliance exteriors. Don’t forget any handles and knobs.

Once you’ve got the kitchen clean, cover the cabinet and pantry shelves with new liner. Not only will it help protect your dishes and other wares, but it’ll give these spaces a fresh clean look and feel when you place your items in it.

3. Floors & Carpets

If you aren’t immediately replacing carpets, give them a deep cleaning with a rug cleaner. If you don’t own or have access to one, you can rent one from a grocery or hardware store. Wash any hardwood floors. To avoid harsh chemicals, you can use water and white vinegar, they’ll eliminate most bacteria and remove most dirt and grime.

Give the bathroom and kitchen floors additional attention by thoroughly washing these floor surfaces with a disinfecting cleaner. Be sure not to miss any nooks and crannies. Clean tile, vinyl or linoleum with a bacteria-killing cleaner and don’t forget any grout—a baking soda paste works nicely.

4. Air Filters

It’s hard to know when air filters were last changed. It’s always a good idea to replace them, just to be on the safe side. Mark the filters with the date, so you know when it’s time to swap them out again.

Tip: Don’t forget the vent filter above the stove if you have one.

5. Door Knobs

Door knobs are easy to overlook but they are a prime area for lingering germs. Go through your home and disinfect doorknobs, cabinet pulls and drawer handles. Don’t forget the handles on sliding glass or shower doors.

Tip: Use disinfectant wipes on doorknobs if you’re short on time

Once you’ve given your house a deep cleaning, you can confidently move your possessions into your home with a fresh, clean start.




Categories: Buying  


Posted by Cindy Gordon on 10/6/2019

Pets are such adorable creatures; they bring tremendous warmth, love, and fun to family life. Just like humans, they've all got their body odors which if left unaddressed can become very offensive. By adopting the suggestions listed below, you would be able to get rid of pet odors from your home.

  • Bathe and Groom your pet: It is important to bathe and groom your pet often to keep them as clean as you want your home as well as curb shedding in unwanted place/quantities. You can learn to appropriately bathe and groom your pet by booking a session with a professional, requesting guidance from your vet or local pet store or browsing the internet.
  • Air Your Home and Take Your Stuff Out to The Sunlight: Most times the process of eliminating odors always involve a great ton of air. Airing alone is believed to take a large part of the scent away before any other thing you do, so you should vacuum your home and every corner that your pet fancy staying to get that freshness again - open up all doors and windows so fresh air and sunlight can make its way home. Also, leave all your furniture, utilities, rugs and any other material that you have got tainted with pet odor, outside in the sunlight. Sunlight is an excellent natural bleaching agent and will help remove any smell trapped within the fibers that airing alone might not get.
  • Find the source of the odors: Before the odors, came the cause of the odors. So, find them and get rid of them. Often, the scent may already be worked up into the floors or any other part of the house not exposed to air. If its pet urine, you'll need to dry it up with paper towels or a mop. When done, you will need to use either a vinegar solution or an enzymatic cleaner to break down the odors. You may also choose to go with a professional stain and odor remover to finish the job. Whatever you do, make sure you get a cleaner that is not toxic to the health of your pets to prevent accidents.

Keeping your home smelling fresh as well as your pet does not have to be an arduous task. These suggestions will come in handy for you, and you can also visit your local pet store for nontoxic cleaners to make your home smell even more delightful.




Tags: cleaning tips   pets   pet odor  
Categories: Cleaning   pet odor   homeowner  


Posted by Cindy Gordon on 9/29/2019

Here are some secret places where dirt and germs accumulate.

Kitchen - The Sponge 

Even though we take time to clean the sink and worktop, there is something that often escapes our routine cleaning... the kitchen sponge. 

How to take care of it?

Opt for sponges that are good quality, dependable, and wash with hot water. The hot water helps kill some germs and makes your cleaning more effective. Flap the sponge well when you're done using it every day to avoid humidity in which the bacteria reproduce.

Living room– Remote Control

One never thinks of cleaning it, yet everyone fiddles with it, makes it fall to the ground; it passes in the hands full of crumbs of chips, under the soles of the slippers; not to mention the times when we sit on it by mistake or those where the dog drool over it.

How to clean it?

Spray a little liquid soap on a cotton swab and clean carefully between the keys.

Bathroom - The toilet seat

The toilet seat sometimes does not get all the cleaning it deserves.

How to clean them?

Washing your toilet set once a week won't suffice. You must do it every day or at least three times a week. The lid is flipped before flushing to prevent the movement of water from causing the bacteria to fly.

Doorknob

Doorknobs can be one of the dirtiest places in the house especially that of washrooms and the ones facing outdoors.

How to clean one?

80% of infectious diseases spread by hands. Think about putting a disinfectant bottle near the door at the entrance and outside your washroom to ensure that the hands that hold the doorknobs are clean and do not transfer any germs.

Bath Mat 

Sometimes you wash the towels and bath and remember to clean the shower. Most times, the bath mat goes scot-free in the middle of household chores. However, it must be washed and changed at least as much as towels or more: because it stays on the ground, wet, and is used by several people. 

How to wash it?

You need to, first of all, stop taking shoes into the bathrooms and also ensure that you clean the bath mat often enough. You should also ensure that your floor mat stays dry as much as possible.

Pay attention to these areas to keep your home clean. Pay extra attention to these areas when cleaning your home for inspection or an open house.