Cindy Gordon
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 774-249-4824 | [email protected]


Posted by Cindy Gordon on 5/9/2021

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Whether it is a seller's market or you just have an appealing home, you could end up with multiple offers -- how can you decide which offer is best? Your agent is an excellent source of information and can help widdle through unqualified buyers, but if you still have to choose between multiple offers, here's what to consider. 

Understand fair market value: You should know what to expect and what a fair offer looks like -- your agent can help you discover what the fair market value is for your home. If there are any mitigating factors (you have been relocated at work or you need to move quickly) they could impact the decision-making process more than price.

Preapprovals in place: If you have multiple offers, the buyer with a preapproval in place has an edge. This signals that not only is the buyer interested in the home, but they are able to pay for it. It also indicates that the closing can move swiftly, since this key element is in place. A higher offer without preapproval could end up falling through if the buyer is unable to secure a mortgage. 

Payment method: In many cases, the type of mortgage the buyer is getting won't matter -- you'll get the funds at closing either way. If you are in a hurry, though, a cash buyer can move more swiftly than one with a conventional mortgage. Buyers using non-conventional mortgages like USDA loans may also encounter delays, as these can take more time to process. 

Timeline: What do the buyers propose as a closing date? Too soon and you'll have to rush to get your own things moved out -- and may end up under pressure to move. Too late and you'll feel like you are waiting forever and living between two homes -- your next, new home and the one you need to sell. 

Contingencies: A contingency for financing, appraisal or inspection is common, but too many contingencies or unusual requests could mean you're in for a problematic closing process. Consider any contingencies the buyer is demanding before deciding which offer is right for you to avoid surprises later in the process. 

Special requests: Are there any unusual requests, or does one buyer want more than others? A buyer who wants you to leave kitchen appliances is reasonable (and most expect these to convey). One who wants your heirloom furniture or outdoor equipment may be asking for more than you want to sell. You should be aware of and consider any special requests when you review offers for your home. 

Having to choose between more than one offer puts you in a great position, but it can still be nerve wracking. Working with an experienced seller's agent to vet the offers and determining which factors matter most to you can help you make the right decision for your home sale. 




Tags: home seller   offer   seller tips  
Categories: Selling  


Posted by Cindy Gordon on 7/26/2020

Image by Pexels from Pixabay

When you list your home for sale, you will have people you don't know exploring the property -- and while real estate agents will supervise them, you will still have extra foot traffic in your home. You can work with your listing agent to ensure that visiting buyers are properly vetted (new listings often attract curious visitors that are not interested in buying, just touring the home). You can also take steps to protect your property during open houses and showings. A security system isn't beneficial -- because the people admitted to your home for a showing have permission to be there. Here's what to do before you list your home to protect your possessions from theft or harm. Most people are well-intentioned and the vast majority of showings are trouble-free but preparing to show your home can give you peace of mind and preserve your privacy and possessions, too. 

Replace originals: If you have original works of art as focal points in some rooms, you may want to replace them with prints, reproductions or lesser works while your home is on the market. Consider having artwork professionally packed by an art historian or specialty mover before your home goes on the market and you won't have to worry about it being in an empty home.  Note that even well-intentioned visitors could damage original art simply by touching it, so evaluate which pieces should stay on display when you show your home. 

Remove small electronics: Your wall mounted flat screen is safe during showings since it is simply too awkward to remove and tote away, but smaller pieces could be at risk. Small electronics like phones, tablets and games should be removed or secured before a showing. These items may also contain your personal information and secure data, so putting them away can protect your privacy, too. 

Secure or remove personal items: Jewelry and other small items should be removed from the home or placed in a safe or other secure location. Even if you don't have a conventional jewelry box or valet on display, consider removing especially valuable or sentimental items while your home is on on the market. 

Most visitors are honest, authentic buyers. However, if you have concerns about theft or damage, sweep your home before you list it and secure or replace any important items.




Tags: Open House   showing   seller tips  
Categories: Selling