Cindy Gordon
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 774-249-4824 | cindygordonhomes@gmail.com


Posted by Cindy Gordon on 5/28/2017

Moving to a new home quite literally uproots your entire life. From moving day on, you’ll be learning to navigate your new home and rebuilding your daily routines.

The first week in your new home is both the most excited and the most chaotic. Boxes are likely still scattered around the house, you’re constantly forgetting where the light switches are, and trying to figure out how to arrange your furniture.

With all of these changes going on it can be easy to get overwhelmed in your new home. That’s why we’ve put together this list of things you should do in your first week at your new house to get settled in and prepared for your new life.

On Moving Day

Day one of your move can only run so smoothly. As a result, it’s important to try and relax throughout the day. Remind yourself that you don’t need to unpack and arrange everything today. It’s also a good idea to keep a checklist of everything you need to accomplish on moving day, whether that’s paying movers, handing over keys, or turning on utilities.

Since the majority of your belongings will likely be in disarray for the next few days, you should make sure you have a box of your daily essentials clearly labeled that you can unpack first. We’re talking about toothbrushes, toiletries, and anything else you’ll absolutely need to get your day started.

The First Week in Your New Home

Once you’ve made it past the first day the hardest part is over. It will soon be easier to get a good night’s sleep in your new bedroom, and your morning routine will run more smoothly.

To be best prepared for the first week in your new home, we’ve prepared a checklist of important items to tackle so that you’re fully settled in as soon as possible.

  • Familiarize yourself with the home. Safety should always be your first priority, even at home. Take the time to find out where your circuit breaker is, your water main valve, light switches, fire extinguishers, and so on. Test your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, or just change the batteries so you know the exact date they were changed.
    It’s also a good idea to develop a fire escape route. Since you and your family aren’t as familiar with the layout of your new home as your old one, it’s important to understand where the best exits are in case of an emergency. Pick a landmark outside that you’ll meet at in case of a fire.

  • Change your locks. A top priority for your first week should be changing out your locks. Not everyone is careful with their keys and discriminate in who they give them to. Whether you choose to hire a locksmith or buy and replace the locks yourself, it’s better to get this task accomplished sooner rather than later.

  • Deep clean. You won’t soon have another opportunity to clean a house that isn’t filled with meticulously arranged furniture. The first week in your new home is a good time to clean the carpets, scrub the corners of each room, and do a thorough cleaning of your refrigerator and cabinets. It’s tempting to start putting items where they’ll go as soon as you arrive, but cleaning first will save you time later. The same principle applies for painting your walls.




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Posted by Cindy Gordon on 10/11/2015

If you are planning a move you are probably busy thinking about the new costs of living, how much the rental truck will cost, packing and how you will get there. What you may not be considering is the hidden costs of moving. Here just a few of the surprise costs of moving and some ideas on how to avoid them: Late Fees When you are moving things get lost in the mail or are slow to be forwarded to your new address. If you miss paying your bills on it can add up in unnecessary late fees. Switch all of your bills to online billing that way you are sure not to miss a payment that is lost in the mail. Overdraft Fees Don't close that bank account just yet. You may have checks or bills still being drawn on that bank account. Leave your bank account open for approximately three months to allow all checks to clear. Doing this will help you avoid any overdraft fees. Contract penalties All of those contracts you have signed may come back to haunt you. Memberships at the gym, country club, day care facility, community association, etc. can cost you. Typically there is some type of annual or monthly contract associated with membership and cancelling early will usually cost you.  Some of these contracts will have an exception for a move so read the terms and conditions before you pay a hefty cancellation fee. Auto insurance Part of the cost of your auto insurance is determined by your address. For example, moving from an area with less population, to a more highly populated area will cost you more in auto insurance. Different states also have different laws regarding insurance coverage. States have different minimum liability requirements so in some states you will need to purchase personal injury protection and uninsured motorist coverage and in others you will not. Health insurance Health insurance can also change when you switch states. Just like auto insurance, health insurance mandates vary among states, too.  Some states require some types of medical procedures are covered while another has not mandated coverage.  Be sure to comparison-shop for your health insurance. While adding up the normal costs of moving expenses like boxes and storage also be sure to check for these hidden costs and try to avoid losing money in your next move.  





Posted by Cindy Gordon on 8/30/2015

Choosing a place to store your personal belongings is an important decision.  You will want to make sure your prized possessions are safe and secure. Here are some hints on how to choose a storage facility: First, determine what kind of storage you need. Call a few facilities to ask about size, cost, climate-control, and access. Do some research online. You can try the Better Business Bureau and other online review sites. Contact the local police department to ask about the crime rate in the area where the facility is located. You may be able to find out if they've had any break-ins or reports of problems. Try to visit the facility in-person before you commit. This way you can tour the units and get answers to any questions you may have.    





Posted by Cindy Gordon on 6/28/2015

You pack all of your belongings in a truck and hope for the best but even with the most careful movers, accidents can happen. Did you know that typical moving insurance barely covers your prized possessions in cause of a problem. Typical moving insurance pays about 60 cents per pound for damaged goods. So if you have a $1,000 item that only weighs 10 pounds you will get a whopping $60 back. To make up the gap you should consider purchasing moving insurance. There are several options for you to choose from: Full value insurance Full value insurance is the most expensive insurance because it covers your whole shipment. If anything is lost, damaged or destroyed, the movers can either offer to repair the item, reimburse you with cash or replace it with a similar item. Check the policy to see if there are coverage limits on certain items. Released value insurance Released value insurance is the most typical type of insurance. It usually covers goods for 60 cents per pound.  Released value insurance is usually offered at little to no cost to you. make sure to check your moving contract, some exclude coverage if you pack your own boxes. Third-party insurance If you choose the mover's released value option, you may want to opt for additional insurance  from a third-party. Under this type of coverage your mover would be liable for 60 cents per pound of damaged goods and the insurance company would pay any of the remaining costs. As with any contract make sure to read the coverage thoroughly so you can make an educated decision about what type of coverage you will have for your move.





Posted by Cindy Gordon on 4/5/2015

Moving can be an expensive endeavor. Even if you decide to rent a truck and move your belongings yourself there are lots of other expenses that can add up. Luckily, there are a few simple ways consumers can save money hauling their belongings from their current home to the next one. Purge your things. Instead of moving things that you don't use sell or donate them. If you decide to donate items to charity, you could save lots of time and even get a tax deduction. Move on a less popular day. The most popular time to move is at the end of the month. Since most closings happen and leases are up at the end of the month there’s more competition for the trucks and moving crews. Moving at the end of the month will also cost you more. Choose your moving date midweek, closer to the middle of the month. Packing materials like bubble wrap and foam peanuts are costly. If you are packing your own items use things you have around the house like bed linens, towels and clothing to pad your items. You can also use newspapers and tissue paper from gift bags. Be careful when using newspaper as the newsprint will smudge on dishes and other items. Don't buy moving boxes check Freecycle and Craigslist for free ones first. Ask around, your friends may have boxes suitable for moving.